Tag Archives: Suspense

The Replacements (A Bruno Johnson Novel) by David Putnam

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Welcome to my tour stop of The Replacements 

by David Putnam.

REVIEW

*****

It was always about the kids. Just when Bruno Johnson believed he was safe from his past, he is ferreted out in Costa Rica and enticed to return to a world of emotional turmoil, kidnapping, and criminals. The Replacements by David Putnam puts the reader on the fast track to a dangerous mission where three young innocent lives are at stake. Former LA cop and convict, Johnson, remains true to his principles when he grants a favor to a former colleague of the Montclair Police Department and friend, Barbra Wicks, for the sake of three children who are victims of a vengeful serial kidnapping by a suspected Jonas Mabry. Bruno is the only one the kidnapper will deal with in negotiating a deal.

Continue reading The Replacements (A Bruno Johnson Novel) by David Putnam

Review – Celtic Sister by Meira Pentermann

 

CELTIC SISTER
By Meira Pentermann

Celtic Sister by Meira Pentermann

REVIEW

Anguish of the soul is either the lit fuse of destruction or the launching pad for personal triumph. Meira Pentermann’s novel Celtic Sister is a powerful struggle with both. Amy Richardson finds herself in an abusive marriage where a push down the stairs and subsequent miscarriage serve as the catalyst for seeking a way out. However, her road to true suffering begins soon after with a whisky bottle and a yearbook, and a nagging question of “Who is Emma Foster?” and “What happened to her?”

 

Continue reading Review – Celtic Sister by Meira Pentermann

Review – The Outlaw River Wilde by Mike Walters

Review - The Outlaw River Wilde

Review – The Outlaw River Wilde by Mike Walters

Mitch Wilde was a smart-ass and a jokester, but he knew his eyes weren’t deceiving him when he saw some strange things in Outlaw River, Oregon. And for a while he kept them to himself.

The Outlaw River Wilde by Mike Walters is a suspenseful excursion through an X-files and Ancient Aliens genre with a few surprises thrown in. His retinue of characters are familiar, comfortable, and engaging beginning with the protagonist, Mitch Wilde, an active and young at heart middle-ager, and his wife, Mabey, who is his attractive, well-liked, common sense counterpart. Jack (Mitch’s close friend since high school) has a near death experience at a neighborhood barbecue and begins behaving oddly in the aftermath. In the backdrop is an eccentric and sage-like neighbor, Jasper, who keeps to himself, but has connected with Mitch and eventually confides some enlightening details of his own.

After a bike-ride spill in the woods, Mitch believes the cause to be an errant arrow nicking his shoulder which sets him off balance both literally and figuratively. The arrow mishap is not so unusual except for the Native American Indian on a white horse he observes across the river who seems to be watching him, and then disappears. When the strange arrow seems to dissolve, later the dots are connected when local Native Americans seem, too, to dissolve into thin air without explanation.

As Mitch and his partner in crime, Jasper, attempt to sort out all of the peculiar events that unfold, other members of the community become more fearful. Walters finally poises the reader on the brink of answers when the two men investigate in stealthy fashion the government-restricted Crater Lake where earlier Mitch recorded alien beings on his camera. A harrowing rescue and an urgency to return to Outlaw River drive the final thrilling scene toward a much anticipated sequel!

 

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Book Description

Who of us, at one time or another, hasn’t wondered if we’re alone in the universe? Mitch Wilde never had until a failed attempt at pulling an arrow out of his best friend Jack’s shoulder began a string of strange and unexpected events in the small Pacific Northwest Town of Outlaw River.

When Native Americans start vanishing throughout the country and re-appearing in strange places on horseback, Mitch is challenged in ways he never dreamed. In addition, who are the uninvited strangers ransacking some of their homes? Added to this, Jack has taken to odd nocturnal treks. The local sheriff releases hostility he has held against Mitch since high school and something—nobody wants to call them UFOs—has just crashed into several surrounding lakes.

Can Mitch keep himself out of jail? Can Mitch figure out what the strange entities emerging from the lake are and why? Can Mitch protect the beautiful life he and his wife Mabey worked so hard to create? Finally, can Mitch help his eccentric neighbor save the residents of Outlaw River before it’s too late?

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Author Mike Walters

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Mike Walters and his debut novel, The Outlaw River Wilde, sprung from an idea while watching Ancient Aliens on the History channel. He intertwines his love of Native American culture and a passion for the Pacific Northwest, primarily his birth state of Oregon. Mike sat down one day and started writing. The characters and story were revealed each and every day he wrote.

“Every session was as if I were reading something new myself for the first time. It was a blast seeing what would happen next. This is why I enjoyed writing this novel so much. ”

Mike is a Director of Marketing & Product at Auto-Graphics, Inc. based in Ontario, CA. That’s California, not Canada. A-G makes software for Libraries, primarily public. So on your visit to the library, when you sit down to search for a book this is the software that A-G makes.

“I am very fortunate to work in an industry that has a meaningful impact on society. It makes going to work each and every day enjoyable. I mean who doesn’t think we need, and who doesn’t love, libraries?”

Mike learned photography as a freshman in high school and later took the passion and used it as a photographer in the United States Air Force. He loves to ride bicycles in SoCal year around, volunteers in Los Angeles at the Westside German Shepherd Rescue taking photos of the beautiful dogs, and has a passion for Micro-brews, particularly Porters and Stouts. You will frequently find him sampling, with his son Alexander, at Claremont Craft Ales, a personal favorite — or one of the many fine breweries in and around Claremont, CA. Mike is currently at work on the follow up to The Outlaw River Wilde, which will be titled – Still Wilde in the Outlaw River. The book should be out later this year or early 2016.

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EXCERPT

Gunther exited the Shack and slid into the city’s white Crown Vic cruiser. He pounded the dashboard with his right hand and cursed. He looked into the rearview mirror and was ashamed at what he saw. Gunther hated Wilde. He allowed the anger to flow. It kept potential tears at bay. He steadied his shaking hand putting the key in the ignition. The sheriff pounded the dashboard one more time for a final release.
He started the engine and backed the cruiser out. There was a screech as a car came to a skidding stop inches from his rear bumper. He shot a hateful stare at the driver in his rearview even though he was at fault. Gunther peeled his teary eyes from the mirror, placed the car in Drive, and pressed the accelerator with his highly polished police-issued black loafers.
He rubbed his forehead with the back of a still-shaking hand while looking up and down the street. He didn’t see Wilde’s Jeep so he flipped on the car’s blue and red emergency lights and aimed toward the mayor’s office.
Gunther plowed the police car into his private parking spot in front of City Hall. Outlaw River’s sheriff was immediately cleared through the security scanners and made a beeline for Mayor Jenkins’ office on the second floor.
When he surged through the outer office door he was greeted by Jenkins’s secretary, Trudy, greeted him. “Good morning, Sheriff. Mayor Jenkins is on the phone. Please wait a moment. I’ll let him know you’re here.”
Gunther grunted some utterance of disrespect and disdain, brushed past the elderly woman, barking, “He’s expecting me, Trudy, and won’t mind.”
The secretary jumped up from her seat and got close on the sheriff’s heels. She normally just rolled her eyes when he passed, but this time she was letting Gunther know this was her domain.
He didn’t slow or pause. Gunther pushed his way into the mayor’s office. He felt the damn secretary’s breath on the back of his neck, where the hair still stood in shame and anger over Mitch Wilde.
Jenkins was, indeed, on the phone. He was hanging up as Gunther entered. “Mayor Jenkins, I am so sorry, I tried to tell the sheriff that you were on the phone, but he barged right in.”
“It’s okay, Trudy, I’m done. Put my calls on hold for the next few minutes and please close the door behind you.”
“Yes, Mayor.” Trudy gave the door a satisfactory slam behind her.
“Jesus, Bob, you can’t barge in here like that. The sky better be falling. What the hell is going on?”
Gunther paced back and forth in front of Jenkins’s desk. Jenkins walked around the desk and sat on the edge. “Sit down, Gunther, and tell me what the hell is going on.”
Gunther swigged his foamy latte and sat in one of the chairs facing Jenkins. “That goddamn Wilde is pissing me off again. I want to make the asshole pay.”
“For high school still? I told you, it’s time to get over whatever happened. It was what, twenty-five years ago? Move on already, Bob. Jesus!”
“Yeah, whatever. He is just so damn arrogant. He threatened me at the Coffee Shack a few minutes ago.”
“Threatened you?”
“Got up in my face and told me he was going to kick my ass if I didn’t back off.”
“Back off. Why would he say that?”
“He accused me of busting the taillight on his Jeep. Said he would gladly spend some time in jail for kicking my ass. Something along those lines.” Gunther took another drink of his latte with a steadier hand. He was finally calming down a bit. Just being in Jenkins’ presence had a soothing effect on him. He seemed to be the only one who understood him and cared about him.
Truth of the matter, Gunther knew deep down the mayor didn’t really care that much about him. He knew the relationship was more convenience for the mayor and staying on the sheriff’s good side made sense. One time the mayor had admitted the uniformed turned him on. Gunther set those thoughts aside hoping someday the mayor would genuinely care for him. He didn’t have many other options in this damn straight-laced little town.
“Well, if he really threatened you, go arrest him. You can’t let people get away with that.”
“Oh, he’d be out in less than an hour. There weren’t any witnesses.”
“If it’s that bad, make it inconvenient for him for a couple of hours, perhaps he’ll get the picture and ‘back-off’ as you want. First, tell me something before you go down this road. Did you break his light? Does this have anything to do with you shouting at him at the Shack the other day?”
Gunther stared out the window and didn’t respond.

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Review – The Tramp by Sarah Wathen

Review - The Tramp by Sarah Wathen
Review – The Tramp by Sarah Wathen

The Tramp (The Bound Chronicles, #1) by Sarah Wathen

“The Tramp” by Sarah Wathen comes from a true artist. The author, a classically trained painter and fine artist, created a true work of beauty. As the first book of “The Bound Chronicles,” it creates a world  you will want to see a lot more of in the future.
“The Tramp” is a story of two young and innocent children, John and Candy. After Candy saved him from a dog attack, they become fast friends. John repays the favor soon thereafter creating a strong bond between them.
Buffalo Square and Shirley County are rich and memorable places, steeped in history. Established in 1927, during Prohibition and between the wars, the town seems like a simpler place and an oasis from a tumultuous world.
As you read on, you soon realize that the town is not as quiet and quaint as it seems. The story is actually more paranormal and suspenseful. There are elements of horror and more to this mysterious place. It is a must read for all suspense lovers as it truly keeps you guessing about what is coming next.

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AboutTheAuthor

An artist turned author, Sarah Wathen is a storyteller by trade and a painter at heart. She was trained in Classical Painting at the University of Central Florida, then completed graduate studies in Fine Art at Parson’s School of Design in New York City. Her first step into the world of independent publishing was as an illustrator, and Sarah quickly realized she wanted to write her own books rather than illustrate others. That reinvention came as no surprise to family and friends, who remember her as a child always ready to turn a tale. Hours spent under the backyard stairs with her sister—dreaming up imaginary friends with outlandish names like Afisha and Pekins, and designing social networks called the Plant Club and the Tutu Group—were recorded and illustrated, too. Copies still exist under lock and key!

Sarah currently resides in Florida and runs the indie label, LayerCake Productions. Look for her first novel, a paranormal mystery due for release in April 2015: The Tramp, Book One of the Bound Chronicles.

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Email: layercakeproductionsllc@gmail.com

Twitter: @SWathen_Author

Facebook: SarahLWathen

Tumblr: swathen.tumblr.com

Instagram: sarah.wathen

Wattpad: SarahWathen

Medium: @sarahwathen

More on LayerCake Productions: www.layercakeproductions.com

Cover Reveal – The Tramp by Sarah Wathen

Take a Look at the Beautiful Cover for The Tramp

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TitleThe Tramp (The Bound Chronicles Book 1)
 
GenreMystery, Thriller &Suspense  > Supernatural > Fantasy > Paranormal & Urban 
 
Author: Sarah Wathen
 
Cover: Sarah Wathen
 
Release DateApril 13, 2015
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Book Description

When John was seven, he found Candy dancing in the neighboring yard wearing a yellow polka-dot bikini and red rain galoshes, splashing and dancing and singing at the top of her lungs. She saved his throat from getting ripped out by her grandma’s guard dog. Good thing she did, too. It was John who raised the alarm that day, when the man who smiled with his mouth but not his eyes drove off with Candy in a cloud of dust. The police stopped whatever might have happened next in a seedy motel—a place Candy doesn’t dare remember. John rescued her, creating a bond between two friends strong enough to awaken…something.

Years later, John and Candy begin to suspect something more sinister lurking amidst the days of football glory and the nights of clandestine rendezvous. John discovers disturbing symbols from the ancient tribes indigenous to the area in his history textbook, in a local cave system, and in his very dreams. Candy uncovers a family history that is more colorful than she knew. If shades of black are colorful.
If only the two friends could foresee the danger looming before them. For another something, one much more dangerous than the first, is waking up to continue the cycle.Murder forces everyone out of sunny valley torpor, and Candy realizes that more than acquaintance connects her with the killer. When a corpse is found, gutted as if for ritual, she knows that whatever evil has overtaken her hometown is moving forward. She will have to exorcise the haunting herself—though she has no idea how—and she will need John’s predestined help to do it. Candy will have to face the memories of that seedy motel room first. At least she finally understands the power she never knew she had—a link to her departed mother and a line of healers shrouded in pre-history.

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About the Author

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Sarah Wathen is an artist turned author. She was trained in Classical Painting at the University of Central Florida, and received her Master’s in Fine Art from Parsons School of Design in New York City. If Florida was where she discovered her passion, New York was the place she found her voice. “Writing a book was my obvious next step, once I realized I’d been trying to tell stories with pictures for years,” she says about transitioning from visual artist to novelist. “Painting with words is even more fun than painting with oil.” Sarah lives in Florida with her husband, son, and at least a dozen imaginary friends from her novels. A painter at heart, her books incorporate art judicially, both in narrative content and supporting materials. Her characters are derived from the people and places that have influenced her own life—at least one beloved pet makes it into every book—but the stories they live will take you places you have never imagined, and won’t want to leave.
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GUEST BLOG POST by Debra Pickett

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 Writing, for Busy People

We’re all busy.  It’s almost a competition these days, talking about how much you have going on and how little sleep you get.

So, if you’re living life and working a job and raising a family, adding something else to the mix – like, say, writing a book – might seem impossible.  And, sometimes, it’s true: there just aren’t enough hours in the day.  But, for a lot of us, a lot of the time, we can find that little bit of extra energy and focus to devote to a creative project if we make it a priority to do so.

I’m incredibly lucky to have honed my writing skills as a newspaper reporter with a daily deadline.  There is nothing better for building the muscles you need to write quickly (and, eventually, maybe even well) than the simple necessity created by the blank screen in front of you and the ticking clock over your shoulder.  The thing you learn this way is that, like so much in life, the key to writing is to just do it.  You just have to get words on the page.  They don’t have to be perfect.  They don’t even have to be good.  But they have to be there.  You have to have a place to start.  As a reporter, I’d start with my notes.  If I couldn’t think of anything better to write, I’d begin by just transcribing the handwritten scribbles from my spiral-bound reporter’s notebook, typing them out and reading them back to myself as they appeared on the screen.  Inevitably, a phrase or a quote or a really interesting fact would reveal itself and I would know I had something.  Anchoring my hopes on that single scrap, I’d bite my lip and start really writing.

Today, as a novelist, I try to apply that same method to writing fiction.  Almost everything I do begins with longhand notes – ideas, observations, snippets of overheard conversations – that I jot down in a little composition book that’s always in my bag.  That way, when I find the time to actually sit down at my computer to really work on my manuscript, I always have a place to start.  I begin by just typing my notes.  Sometimes, the best I can do with them is to find “homes” for them within my very detailed outline.  (I use Storymill software for maintaining a database of scenes, keeping a plot timeline and tracking details of my characters’ lives.  There are lots of tools out there to buy or make that can help you do the same.)  Other times, I can take some little moment and begin to craft it into an entire scene.  Either way, when I do sit down at my computer for writing time, I still hold myself to a deadline: I will work on this until 5:30. 

For me, planning and measuring out my writing time is essential to being productive.  I keep a ridiculously detailed calendar that includes my work commitments, my kids’ activities, personal appointments, social plans, my husband’s travel schedule, dedicated blocks of time for running and exercise and even the two TV shows that I consider to be required viewing (The Good Wife and Parenthood).  When I have a realistic and comprehensive view of how my time will be used in a given week, I then identify a couple of blocks of time that I can take for writing.  These precious hours need to come when the rest of my family is occupied and when I’m not completely exhausted.  Some weeks, I can only manage to find 90 minutes like this.  That’s not a lot, but it’s not zero, either.

As I said, I consider myself incredibly fortunate to have had a chance, in my journalism career, to develop the kind of discipline it takes to write when you have very limited time.  For those who haven’t had that chance, I think there are a few ways to cultivate the same mindset and skills.

First – and, in my experience, this was the very hardest thing – you have to give yourself permission to do this.  Writing a novel and having it published was a lifelong goal for me; truly, what I’d dreamed of doing since I was a little girl.  But, somehow, on a daily basis, other things always seemed more important.  I was either working a job (first as a journalist and then as a media consultant) or building my business (the legal PR firm I now run) or taking care of my kids or spending time with my husband or managing our house or running or cooking or cleaning up …. Well, you get the picture.  The idea of walking away from any of that in order to work on a creative hobby like writing felt just utterly selfish to me.  I have 3 kids less than 3 years apart in age.  There were several brutally sleep deprived early years when I simply could not fathom having “alone time” or “me time” that did not involve also getting the groceries.  Still, at a certain point, something clicked with me and I recognized that I was really losing myself in all those responsibilities.  I needed to write creatively again to find myself.  And, ultimately, I believe that my family is better off for having me happy, fulfilled and (not least) a role model for following your dreams and ambitions.

Second, it’s important to be realistic and clear about your goals and priorities.  Sit down and honestly assess the amount of time you can devote to writing.  For most of us, there is some amount of “lost” time we can reclaim for things that are important to us: the time we spend zoned out on the Internet or in front of the TV or flipping through magazines.  It’s important, though, to recognize that you do need some of this down time, just to give your brain a break.  For most of us, a plan to write for three hours each night after the kids go to be just isn’t going to work.  If writing is important to you, try to start by finding 1 or 2 hours a week to devote to it.  Maybe it will be your lunch break one day a week or maybe you’ll declare one night a week as “pizza night” and use the recovered cooking time for your project instead.  Or maybe you’ll escape to a coffeehouse on Sunday afternoon.  The point is: find some time and start there.

Third and finally, finding some kind of external accountability for being productive in your writing is key.  Whether you sign up for a course, join a writing group with weekly meetings, or try something totally off the wall, like NaNoWriMo, having other people invested in your work, and waiting to see what you produce, is a tremendous motivator.  If these options feel too social, you might also find an online forum or a personal writing coach, with whom you can agree on a schedule to deliver a certain number of words (of any quality) or a certain amount of time to devote to your project.

 

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Who is Avraham Anouchi? An Unusual Interview

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How do you feel about your family, now that you’re an adult?

I can’t complain. My only son is a surgeon. I have four grandchildren. After losing my first wife to cancer, I built my new life with my present wife, whose five grandchildren call me grandfather.

What do you want from life? Nothing more than I already have.

If you were granted three wishes, what would you ask for?

Health and enough time to write a master family tree for posterity.

What three things would you take to have in a Desert Island? Books, a computer and my wife.

What, in the outside world, is preventing you from getting it? I don’t want to be in a desert island.

How do you fall in love? At first sight? Over a long period? It’s history. I just fell in love.

What parts of loving come easy for you? Hard? I’m not a psychiatrist. I am an engineer.

How do you decide if you can trust someone? Experience with others? with this person? First impressions? Intuition? Do you test the person somehow? Or are you just generally disposed to trust or not to trust? I am fortunate to have learned how to evaluate people I meet. I don’t rely on intuition. I carry a conversation and measure a new person by his or her responses.

When you walk into a room, what do you notice first? Second? People and their facial expressions.

Describe yourself to me. I am six feet in height weighing 180 Lbs. I am physically active and maintain my health by eating fish most of the time.

Is one sense more highly developed than another? I wear glasses. I am hearing impaired and use hearing aids. I use captioning when I watch television. I go out to see  movies only if they are in a foreign language with subtitles.

Did you turn out the way you expected? The way your parents predicted? I don’t think my parents ever imagined that I would wind up in Harvard. I am satisfied with my education and with my professional accomplishments.

What really moves you, or touches you to the soul? My passion for Israel.

What’s the one thing you have always wanted to do but didn’t/couldn’t/wouldn’t? What would happen if you did do it?

I wanted to trace my family tree as far back as its source in Toledo Spain before the expulsion of Jews in 1492. I succeeded to reach only as far back as 1790 even after spending two days in the Madrid archives of Jewish History and in a day at the University of Aix-en-Provence archives of French Jews outside France. 

What do you consider are your strengths? Ability to learn, analyze and design new things. I hold five patents.

What do you consider are your weaknesses? Patience. I have trouble when I deal with people who are very slow. 

What is one physical attribute you are proud of? I was winner in high school sports. Nobody could beat me in High Jumps and 100-Meter races.

What one physical attribute would you change? I would be ecstatic with good hearing

What do you consider your special talent? Ability to learn, analyze and design new things. I hold five patents.

What are you most proud of about your life? Serving as Vice President of a large Corporation and founding my own corporation.

Describe your ideal mate. That would require to describe my ideal mate who lost her battle to cancer and my present wife who fills my life.

What are you most afraid of? Anti-Semitism.

If you could be an animal, what would it be? (You can adapt this question to fit the character ie/make it what kind of car, plant, whatever.)

I don’t want to be an animal. God created humans to make them different from animals by enabling them to speak, think and create a beautiful world. Why would anyone want to be an animal? I certainly don’t want to be a car or a plant. I want to be creative.

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Avraham Anouchi is an author, engineer, inventor, and entrepreneur. He grew up in Israel dreaming of studying engineering at the Technion Institute of Technology in Haifa. He earned his engineering degrees in the United States, but left his heart in Haifa. He is a former Vice President in United Technologies Corporation. He is now the president and founder of a high technology engineering company.

Website: http://www.Anouchibooks.com

Twitter handle: https://twitter.com/AviYoel

Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/avraham.anouchi?sk=info&edit=eduwork

Goodreads author page: https://www.goodreads.com/GoodreadscomAvrahamAnouchi

Amazon link: http://www.amazon.com/TIMNA-MARS-Searching-Earth-Metals-ebook/dp/B00LBFWP92/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1413131822&sr=1-1&keywords=from+timna+to+mars

Elite Book Promotions- Start a Buzz About Your Book

DAVID CLIVE PRICE “LEADING YOU INTO UNEXPLORED TERRITORY.”

DAVID CLIVE PRICE

“LEADING YOU INTO UNEXPLORED TERRITORY.”

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David Clive Price has been at various times a wine and olive farmer in Italy, a Renaissance scholar, speechwriter for one of the world’s leading banks, a strategic adviser to Asian multinationals, and an explorer of the unknown corners of South Korea, Japan, China, the Philippines, Taiwan and Myanmar (Burma), to name just a few of his ‘unexplored territories’.

He has written books on the ‘lost civilization’ of rural Italy, music and Catholic conspiracies in Elizabeth I’s England, Buddhism in the daily life of Asia, the secret world of China’s Forbidden City, the darker corners of corporate life in pre-recession London and Hong Kong, off-the-beaten track Seoul and South Korea, the ethnic sub-culture and risky underworld of 1980s New York.

3c1f60fe493b0aa39ba1d7.L._V342770694_SX200_INTERVIEW WITH DAVID CLIVE PRICE BY ERIC WENG FROM WWW.UNEXPLOREDTERRITORY.NET

Q. What really floats your boat? Why did you go to the Far East and why now publish all these books about Asia business cultures, along with novels and travelogues set in Asia?

A. ‘I have always been attracted by other cultures and what lies beyond. It’s like an instinctive reaction to any new place. I get a sort of obsession with the idea a new and strange experience – a world I have never set foot in before, an adventure, something with risk involved, something that may or may not make me money but that promises to be in some way spiritual.

Q: What do you mean by that?

I don’t mean holy and going to church (eve if I have become a Buddhist on my travels). It means discovering something about the world that suggest other dimensions, like all those spirits and demons and Taoist or Shinto gods of nature in Asia cultures.

Of course, it can be something quite banal like lighting incense for the God of Prosperity or choosing the lucky number 8 for your mobile phone and house numbers, as almost all Chinese do. But it can also be the discovery of religious rituals or simple domestic and family beliefs that make life seem so much richer and full of wonder.

Q: When did you first discover this about yourself?

It’s hard to say exactly when. I was a precocious schoolboy with a penchant for entertaining my classmates with ironic pop songs (Tom Jones, for example) and little skits that made the class laugh before the teacher arrived. I played Hamlet at school, fell of the stage at a school play competition and discovered my ability to be resilient by just carrying on. I recited Keats and Wordsworth to myself in my bedroom mirror or in the local woods. I loed to go out on ventures.

Later I won a choral scholarship to Cambridge after the tutor got me completely drunk on sherry because of my nerves. The common thread in all this was a belief in my guardian spirit, and in my resilience, and a readiness to take on the new in order to learn. I was always in the library and I date my passion for the German, Italian and French languages from my time at school.

Q: You seem to have had everything necessary to pursue a successful career. What happened? Your career is not exactly a straight line from the look of these books.

‘Every time I have been set up with what seems a conventional career, I have taken a calculated risk and broken free to pursue something entirely different, something that is often diametrically opposed to the world in which I have been trained to excel.’

‘When I finished my Ph.D. on ‘Music and Patrons of the English Renaissance’ (the History Faculty at first refused the subject) I didn’t wait to receive my doctorate. I headed straight for Switzerland and my first big love affair, living in a tiny rooftop atelier in the old town of Zurich.’

‘However, the British Academy had given me a fellowship to do postgraduate research at Bologna University for a book on the Italian Renaissance. I therefore continued on to Italy (my second great love) and pursued this research diligently in the archives of various north Italian cities. But after a year of being a professor type, I jacked it in and went over the Apennines to search for a cheap place to live and perhaps write a completely kind of book and lead a more satisfying life.’

Q: Where did you end up?

My partner and I found an old farmhouse in an Etruscan hilltop town, dirt cheap, perched on the side of a valley with a lovely tower for my study. To the accompaniment of sparrows in the roof eaves building their nests, I first of all translated into English the Italian poet and filmmaker Pie Paolo Pasolini on his travels in India and then considered what kind of book I might write myself.

I was farming wine and olives and vegetables quite intensively by then, and had entered full scale into the local country life, making friends with all the neighbouring farmers. My own “mezzadro” (share cropper) was teaching me all about binding vines and pruning olive trees so I ended up writing a book about Italian rural life called The Other Italy. It’s still in print on Amazon. And I began a novel.

Q. Why did you decided on a novel? What was the inspiration?

A journey I took to shake up my comfortable rural existence. I went to New York for a year in 1979 and decided to live in the most “edgy” neighbourhood possible: Alphabet City, or Avenues A to Z. Nowadays it’s been gentrified but back in the early 1980s it was a hotbed of creativity, drugs, prostitution, the gay and lesbian underworld, and a fascinating mix of blacks, whites, Puerto Ricans, Ukrainians, Russians, Jews, every race under the sun.

So I began the novel from a ringside seat in my Lower East Side apartment on a very edgy street, and finished it in total calm in the Tuscan countryside.

Q. Do you like extremes? Is that what makes you a writer?

No, I’m not an extreme person in that sense. But I love a challenge and adventure, and almost instinctively I try to get right under the surface of the prevailing culture. In this sense, all the books that have followed including my novel Chinese Walls, just published and set in London and Hong Kong, and Phoenix Rising; A Journey Through South Korea, are attempts to get beneath the surface of other worlds (corporate London, East Asian, imperial Beijing, post-colonial Hong Kong, and so on).

Q. Is that what your business books are also about? I see they are called the Master Key Series

Yes, in a way the business books and the Asia fiction/travel are inspired by the same passion: deep diving, learning from the clash of cultures, trying everything, listening rather than always talking, being patient, observing, learning a “new language”. The Master Key to Asia and The Master Key to Asia offer a system for getting into other worlds – in this case Asian business worlds – by learning the cultures and assimilating, not sticking out, imitating.

Q.  Is that your technique as a writer?

Yes, you could say that. I was entranced when researching my CUP book on Elizabethan musicians and courtiers how much they had to dissemble and hide up their Catholic sympathies. Many of them led double lives, any yet they merged into the status quo of court life.

They were successful because they learned how to act. In terms of daily habits, this often meant that they had to lurk in strange places to meet fellow Catholic sympathisers. Chroniclers of the time described them as being “seen in lurcking sorte” in out of the way places like Esher or Dover.

Q. Is this something important to you? Being a kind of spy?

Yes, I rather see myself as a “lurker”. My novelistic technique is to hang around at street corners, go to places in a town where no one else goes, sit at the wheel of my car in a supermarket car park and watch what the people are doing. Novelists are always doing that, looking over the shoulder or from a distance, merging into the background. It’s a great metaphor for the way I work and research.

In the same way, I advise my business clients to become “Chinese” or “Korean” or “Indonesian” as much as they can, to try everything local and not be put off, to get out of the expat ghetto in the cities of Asia and discover the real world beyond. The best way to do that is to plunge in and be a spy from the inside, not from the outside.

Q. Finally, what came first for Chinese Walls or Phoenix Rising – the plot or the main character or the main idea or none of the above?

I usually start with a feeling inside, which evolves eventually into a starting point for a plot. The main character slips onto the stage at the same time. Then as I develop the plot and structure, I slowly start to get a feeling for what the book is about – its main idea. And after a few attempts at an opening chapter or two, it starts to flow. If it doesn’t start to flow, I put it away (perhaps only for a while or perhaps for years) and work on something else.

Q. Do you any other books in your Unexplored Territory trilogies that are waiting for the light of day in a bottom drawer or are ‘evolving’ into a plot?

The next novel in the Unexplored Territory series is called Last Train to Mandalay and is entering the final edit stage for publication by Christmas 2014. The next travel book in the series, Glimpses of Snow Country: Travels in Japan, is largely written but awaits 2-3 extra chapters on areas of Japan’s Snow Country, such as Hokkaido, which I am visiting in the near future for both a business conference and researching the book. A book on Japan will complement my book on South Korea and provide I hope an interesting comparison.

Q. What is the message you’d like to share with the world?

“To cultivate a sense of wonder”

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All David Clive Price’s books are available as Amazon paperbacks and Kindles.

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Author website: http://www.davidcliveprice.com/books

Author blog: http://unexploredterritory.net

Amazon Author page: http://www.amazon.com/author/davidcliveprice

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About the Author- Lorraine Pestell

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Lorraine Pestell was born in London and has had a successful career as an Information Technology professional in the UK, US, Europe, Singapore, and more recently Australia. Lorraine currently resides in Melbourne, Victoria, with her 13-year-old dog.
Although still working full-time, Lorraine is a passionate volunteer for several organisations, including serving on the Board of Directors of Propel Youth Arts WA, being a mentor for The Smith Family’s iTrack program and providing project management assistance to The School Volunteer Program. She finds that volunteering time and energy to those less fortunate is an effective antidote to life-long depression and the symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.
The idea for “A Life Singular” originated when Lorraine was 14 years old, and the story has continued to develop in fits and starts since then, whenever time and life events permitted. However, three years ago, a new element of the plot triggered a sudden urge to complete the novel, and since then the story has evolved into six separate parts.

 

Books by Lorraine Pestell

A life Singular

A novel in six parts, serialised as e-books and paperbacks, “A Life Singular” tells the story of a successful celebrity writing his autobiography after the tragic loss of his wife. In essence a love story, “A Life Singular” is about dealing with mental illness, the choices we make between right and wrong, and how one affects the other. Some of life’s lessons are harder to learn, and some amazing opportunities easier to take. The trick is always to understand the consequences of our choices, before it’s too late… The series has been written by a sufferer of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), with the hope of inspiring other sufferers of depression, anxiety and other related symptoms to rise above them and make a success of their lives. It also aims to inform non-sufferers that it is possible for people with mental illness to co-exist and thrive, with their love and support, instead of viewing these behaviours as strange or dangerous.

A novel in six parts, serialised as e-books and paperbacks, “A Life Singular” tells the story of a successful celebrity writing his autobiography after the tragic loss of his wife. In essence a love story, “A Life Singular” is about dealing with mental illness, the choices we make between right and wrong, and how one affects the other. Some of life’s lessons are harder to learn, and some amazing opportunities easier to take. The trick is always to understand the consequences of our choices, before it’s too late… The series has been written by a sufferer of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), with the hope of inspiring other sufferers of depression, anxiety and other related symptoms to rise above them and make a success of their lives. It also aims to inform non-sufferers that it is possible for people with mental illness to co-exist and thrive, with their love and support, instead of viewing these behaviours as strange or dangerous.

Get The Book Here:

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The second novel of six, serialised as e-books and paperbacks, “A Life Singular” tells the story of a successful celebrity writing his autobiography. In essence a love story, “A Life Singular” is about dealing with mental illness, the choices we make between right and wrong, and how one affects the other.

Part Two

Writing an autobiography on behalf of someone else presented Jeff with an interesting dilemma. Did he make assumptions about what Lynn would have included, or should he restrict her contribution to direct quotes from her letters and diaries? He had their kids to protect, and her parents…

As he worked through the huge amount of material available in the press about their life as it had taken shape, interlacing it with highly personal stories, the widower crafted chapter after chapter of memories, both happy and heartbreaking. If this was to be a true account of their partnership, he owed it to the memory of his beautiful best friend to cover so much more than what was already on public record.

When it came to adding his own reminiscences of those early months, about meeting someone he already knew intimately, Jeff had no difficulty in recalling every single, vivid moment. Entire conversations came back to him, sometimes word for word, rushing through his fingers and into the computer.

Photographs prompted him too, as did the treasured possessions that surrounded him, like the old leather jacket he had received on his twentieth birthday. Lynn had left him shortly after that, just like she had left him now. The pull of being together again was unrelenting, but Jeff hung on to the dream that their life singular would one day resume.

Once their story had been told.

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About the Author- Jamie Eubanks

Jamie Eubanks

 

Jamie Eubanks was born in Blythe, California and has traveled the country extensively, living in various places in the USA, including Vermont, Massachusetts, Florida, Arizona, Louisiana & California. She has enjoyed a wide array of professions, including entertainer (bass player & singer in various night clubs), acquisitions at “The Jewish Community News” (San Gabriel & Pomona Valley issues), and presently runs a small private investigations firm in Southern California. She is also a regular at the Red Dragon Karate studio in Azusa, CA.

 

Books by Jamie Eubanks

Hidden_Doors,_Secret_Cover_for_Kindle

Jillian Braedon possesses a secret so explosive that she must be silenced. On the run with her five-year-old daughter, stranded in the middle of a blizzard and critically injured, Jill sends little Valerie off into the raging storm alone. The child stumbles onto the property of retired musician-turned-recluse, John Mills, begging for help. John soon finds himself caught up in their torment, and face-to-face with the pursuing covert agents, who will do anything to destroy the secret, and silence everyone involved.

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“This is a phenomenal first novel; an excellent read for anyone who
loves mystery, and would-be writers who want to learn exactly how it’s
done.” – KIRKUS REVIEWS
“This brisk and original cat-and-mouse thriller exceeds expectations
with unpredictable results…
Fans of mysteries and thrillers will find that this book exceeds any expectations they may have had going in, primarily due to its unconventional plot line.” – CLARION REVIEW