Category Archives: Fiction

Learning to Stutter by Sherm Davis

LearningToStutter-Sherm_Davis_Banner-1

Welcome to my tour stop of “Learning to Stutter” by Sherm Davis, presented by Elite Book Tours.  To follow the full tour, please visit here.

BUY NOW @ AMAZON!

Stuttering Awareness

Kenneth Kocher seems to have it all – a good heart, a sense of humor, decent looks, and lots of money. What he doesn’t have is something most of us take for granted – freedom of speech. Kenneth lives with a severe stutter which has wreaked havoc with his life since childhood.

After much embarrassment, pain and soul-searching, Kenneth realizes that to free his inner self he must accept the fact that he cannot be cured, and that he must learn to stutter with grace. Along the way he meets another stutterer and a young widow who are both dealing with the stumbling blocks in their own lives.

Using an experimental syntax to portray the neurological component of the syndrome, the novel gives the reader a unique view of stuttering from the inside out.

Amazon | Createspace

PRAISES FOR “LEARNING TO STUTTER”

This is an extraordinary book. It’s the inside dope on stuttering. And if one person was born to tell the story, it’s David Sherman. And does he have a story to tell. The plot is consummate, the writing proficient, the pacing skillful, with a clarity of detail that renders it very realistic.

After awhile, I found myself caring about all the characters, even (or particularly) the minor ones, oftentimes because they reminded me of myself, and were therefore incredible familiar.

It is a reflection of the author’s versatility –as educator, in math and Language Arts, as musician and writer –and diversity –Jewish, New York born and bred, having resided all over the world –that some parts of the writing even speak to the Oriental in me.

As each of the characters, stuttering and non-, go about their lives, problem-solving, adapting, you cannot help but see the parables at a universal level.

Resonant, poignant, and ultimately elucidatory, this book get an A+ from me.

—- Ling T., Guatemala

In addition to those who struggle with dysfluency and their friends and family, I highly recommend this novel to educators and speech pathologists to ensure their understanding of the multi-faceted impact that this neurological syndrome can have on one’s identity.

—- Shari Mayerson, MS, CCC-SLP

EXCERPT FROM “LEARNING TO STUTTER”

Why is the name so difficult? Perhaps because there is no way to reach into the verbal bag of tricks which every person who stutters carries with him in a desperate attempt to seem normal.

Word substitution (the favorite of all stutterers who block more on certain sounds than others) is impossible when the name is fixed and finite.

Linking the end of one sound to the start of another to increase fluidity is impossible also, because the name begins with a specific sound, and most stuttering occurs on the initial syllable of a word.

But the great author, unaware of Kenneth Kocher’s internal trauma, was in a hurry, and only scribbled his name and gave a cursory nod before moving on to the next person in line. It was only as he was walking away that KK realized that he was fixating on his own name, and hadn’t said a single word to one of his personal heroes.

On the heels of this humiliation, he still had one more errand to run, and it was better to get it over with early in the day. When he entered the toy and game store, he really didn’t know what he was looking for.

He walked up and down the aisles of the small shop, but couldn’t find anything that struck his fancy. Finally the shopkeeper, a jovial man in his fifties, horseshoe bald with a red pate and dramatic waxed moustache like the character from Monopoly, came over and played the part.

“What are you looking for, son?”

“A gift for my six-year-old nephew,” was the sentence that formed itself with perfect clarity, sonority and resonance in his brain. But just after the sentence was formed, he scanned ahead and found a stutter reflex embedded in the /g/ in gift.

Automatically, he sought to substitute a synonym, but in this case he couldn’t even substitute the word present, because the /p/ was his nemesis, the hardest sound in the lexicon and one to be avoided at almost any cost.

So he got past the opening vowel and then hit the hard /g/ like an electric fence.

His larynx locked and he started pushing against it with brute force, but it wouldn’t budge.

His face and neck started twitching, and his left eye was blinking out of control. The harder he pushed, the harder he jerked and twitched.[1]

Finally he caught hold of himself and let go of his breath. Inhaling anew, he substituted one sound for another. “^Ssssssomething fffffor mmmmy nephew.”

It was stilted and spasmodic, but got the point across, more or less.
He could see the surprise in the storekeeper’s face, but he was used to seeing this.

All his life, he had been watching people try to figure out how to respond to his twisted speaking voice.

“Well,” the man said, maintaining an amiable front, “what is your nephew like?”

The second interaction of the day, and it wasn’t going well, either. He was floundering in a neurological rut, and he couldn’t make it stop.

His larynx slammed shut on its own accord, his left arm shot into the air like it was connected to an invisible string, and the muscles in his face and neck began quivering under the strain.

He pulled himself together and responded slowly, too slowly, “^~I…. ^d-d-don’t know. I nnnnnever see him.”

“Hmm,” the shopkeeper tugged at his moustache. “That makes it a bit more difficult, but I’m sure we have something.

Are you looking for something educational, mechanical, sports-oriented, or just plain fun?”

He shrugged his shoulders. “Sssomething he ‡can ^g-grow into.”

The paunchy man nodded sagely from behind his suspenders and his bowtie. “I’ve got just the thing,” he said, and went into the back roozm. The shopkeeper returned with a magnetic construction set, simple enough for a young boy but advanced enough for his father to enjoy as well, and handed him the box. “What do you think?”

KK nodded his appreciation and gave a thumbs-up, too taut to say anything. On other days, he might have made the effort to ask the man to gift-wrap the box, but when a day began like this, every word was precious.

“This is a gift for a nephew who lives far away?” the man deduced.

“Would you like me to wrap it for you?”

Exhaling a sigh of relief for the man’s telepathy and compassion, KK nodded his head and handed him a credit card. Walking out of that toy store, he was unable to even thank the man.

Cursing himself and vowing to never shop in a store again for as long as he lived – he’d shop online instead – he stuffed the gift in his backpack and started power walking through the streets.

OTHER BOOKS FROM SHERM DAVIS

This bilingual English/Spanish collection contains pieces ranging from flash fiction to folktale.

Set in New York, New & Old Mexico, Guatemala, Italy, and the future, eight morsels of Zap Fiction lead off the collection, and five longer stories close it out.

The Spanish translations, the product of a team of professionals, are as true to the original English as possible.

Buy NOW @ Amazon | Createspace

ShermAuthorPic

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

David Howard Sherman Davis is a writer, musician and international educator who has taught in five countries on four continents. Born in Brooklyn, New York, and raised on Long Island, he currently lives by Lake Atitlán in Guatemala. His journalism and fiction have appeared in the United States, Canada, Guatemala, and online.

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Soundcloud

Review- The Opposite of Love by T.A. Pace

Welcome to my tour stop of The Opposite of Love by T.A.Pace.  The full tour schedule can be seen here.

Review

The Opposite of Love by T. A. Pace

Ingredients to a successful relationship? To love? Good sex, according to thirty-something and single Melanie Leon who cannot seem to make the leap of commitment and instead relies on the “friends with benefits” approach… until she meets police officer James Perolo in T. A. Pace’s The Opposite of Love. As witness to a tragic car accident resulting in the death of an infant, Melanie recounts the impressionable details to Perolo who follows up with a phone call offering some emotional consolation that leads to a first date.

 

Continue reading Review- The Opposite of Love by T.A. Pace

New Release by Kisha Green

Crazy Sexy Deadly

by Kisha Green

CSDWEBSITE

Book Description

Crazy, Sexy and Deadly is a compilation of some of Kisha Green’s most popular short stories. Take a journey to a place of mental seduction, love, betrayal, deceit with the perfect splash of erotica to entice the reader’s palate. All women have a beast within but only with the right chemistry can one bring one of the three out; the crazy, the sexy or the deadly…

Continue reading New Release by Kisha Green

Review – Facade Unveiling the Masquerade by J. Kahele

Review - Facade Unveiling the Masquerade

Review – Facade – Unveiling the Masquerade by J Kahele

“Facade – Unveiling the Masquerade” by J Kahele is more than just another romance novel. It is a thriller full of intrigue. Favorite characters Liam and Ally both return in this second book of the acclaimed series.
Liam Sheldon, the book’s protagonist, takes a job in Maryland, referred to as the “Maryland Project.” Soon he finds himself returning to Chicago to testify against his old flame, Kate. In doing so he realizes how strong his feelings are for Ally.
Liam carries an old faded Polaroid photo of Ally and himself out for a night on the town. In addition, a very personal love note accompanies the image from the one he truly loves.
A driven man, full of life and sexual desire, has his target in his sights and will stop at nothing to get her.
Even with all of his recent business success, Liam realizes that there are certain things even money cannot buy. A meeting at a restaurant outside the courthouse confirms his strong feelings for her. Ally tries to convince herself that he is no good for he, but to no avail.
Liam’s ex, Kate, is on trial for the attempted murder and kidnapping of Ally. Is she guilty or criminally insane? Her antics and stalking of Ally are very suspect in this story.
As impulsive as he is driven, Liam often treats himself to a life of luxury. By fully indulging in all the trappings of wealth that a successful career can bring, he truly does “live large.”
His best friend and “bro” Stark makes a great buddy character for Liam and he is never far from the action. The two play well off of each other and even provide some nice comic relief that helps connect the story together as we move along the hero’s journey.
But he is as generous with gifts as he is as a lover when it comes to Ally. The scenes involving their interactions are engaging and well written.
Will he claim her as his prize in the end? You must read this one to find out. we can only hope it all works out in the end.
If you enjoyed the “Mine” trilogy, you should definitely check out the “Facade” books. The ending is satisfying and the author does a great job in creating a set of bookend scenes around this story. And hopefully we are now set up for more to come in this series.

Amazon

 

FACADE_Banner

When Liam Sheldon is summoned to Chicago, to testify for the prosecution against Kate, and is again reunited with Ally, he realizes he can no longer hold back his feelings for her and his want to be with her, takes over his complete existence.

He reveals to Ally that he has made a terrible mistake, leaving her, that he loves her and asks her to take him back. But Ally is reluctant, afraid he will break her heart again.

Facade_Blurb

Goodreads button

imgres

AboutTheAuthorI am a married mother of three teenage girls and live in south eastern Michigan. I have one flaw that could rightly be considered the worst flaw possible. I procrastinate constantly, which gets me into a little more trouble than I like, especially with my girls. I love to swim, ride horses, relax to a good book and spend time with my family. Writing has helped me to calm down the very hectic life I have and release the scattered thoughts that often run through my head,(no I don’t hear voices), but I do envision characters of my books, when I see people interacting around me. That’s pretty much sums up my life!

Facade_Excerpt1

After months of hard work and dedication, the Maryland project was finally ready for sale. With over five hundred business owners bidding for the new improved company, Liam sat in on negotiations for weeks before finally choosing a buyer.

The project not only proved to be the most profitable one, but it also defined his company as one of the most sought-after investment companies in the world. His email constantly swarmed with potential customers begging for him to buy them out.

He should be ecstatic, proud that he had finally accomplished the one feat he strived for—success. But the triumphant prosperity was bittersweet. Selling out his heart to a life of loneliness was not worth the price.
Sitting at his desk, he glanced fondly at the Polaroid, snapped by a photographer when he traveled with Ally to New York to see the play Les Miserables. He frowned as he saw the dingy yellow cast surround the fading picture, a common consequence of the cheap film. His lip quirked up on one side slightly as her reflection caught his eye, her shiny dark hair framing her face elegantly, bringing attention to the gold flecks in her amber eyes. She is so beautiful.

Even after eight months, his heart still ached for her every breathing moment.
Sliding his hand into his suit coat pocket, he pulled out the folded paper that he carried with the Polaroid everywhere he went. It was his reminder of a happier time, the only thing that helped him make it through each agonizing day without her.

A lump began to form in his throat as he carefully unfolded the note she had left him the morning after they had made love for the first time. It read:
Liam,

I wanted to thank you for an unbelievable night. I know it may be a one-time thing, and I don’t expect more. But I need you to know that it was very special to me and a night I will always remember.
Ally xoxo

Memories instantly flooded his mind: her invisible scent tingling through his nose; her smile playing tricks on his eyes as he envisioned her staring down at him.
“Ally,” he muttered, and instantly the vision disappeared. The illusion devastated him and he grunted, squeezing his eyes closed tightly as a soaring fleet of mixed emotions shot through his head, making him restless and shaky. God, I miss her!

The guilt and regret still lay heavy on his heart, igniting the suffering and agony that seemed to haunt him since he had left Chicago. Breathlessly he grabbed the sides of his head, yanking at his hair, attempting to quote his mantra, the one that made him better, stronger—but  the words dissipated from his mind and only visions of Ally and the last time he saw her lingered behind his eyelids.

Her eyes—those beautiful eyes, glazed with hurt and pain that he had cast upon her, after he selfishly shattered his promise to never break her heart.
“We were no good for each other,” he mumbled under his breath. But even as the words floated out of his mouth, he knew there was no real truth to them.

Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads | Pinterest | LinkedIn| Website

Review – The Tramp by Sarah Wathen

Review - The Tramp by Sarah Wathen
Review – The Tramp by Sarah Wathen

The Tramp (The Bound Chronicles, #1) by Sarah Wathen

“The Tramp” by Sarah Wathen comes from a true artist. The author, a classically trained painter and fine artist, created a true work of beauty. As the first book of “The Bound Chronicles,” it creates a world  you will want to see a lot more of in the future.
“The Tramp” is a story of two young and innocent children, John and Candy. After Candy saved him from a dog attack, they become fast friends. John repays the favor soon thereafter creating a strong bond between them.
Buffalo Square and Shirley County are rich and memorable places, steeped in history. Established in 1927, during Prohibition and between the wars, the town seems like a simpler place and an oasis from a tumultuous world.
As you read on, you soon realize that the town is not as quiet and quaint as it seems. The story is actually more paranormal and suspenseful. There are elements of horror and more to this mysterious place. It is a must read for all suspense lovers as it truly keeps you guessing about what is coming next.

 sarahwathenphoto

AboutTheAuthor

An artist turned author, Sarah Wathen is a storyteller by trade and a painter at heart. She was trained in Classical Painting at the University of Central Florida, then completed graduate studies in Fine Art at Parson’s School of Design in New York City. Her first step into the world of independent publishing was as an illustrator, and Sarah quickly realized she wanted to write her own books rather than illustrate others. That reinvention came as no surprise to family and friends, who remember her as a child always ready to turn a tale. Hours spent under the backyard stairs with her sister—dreaming up imaginary friends with outlandish names like Afisha and Pekins, and designing social networks called the Plant Club and the Tutu Group—were recorded and illustrated, too. Copies still exist under lock and key!

Sarah currently resides in Florida and runs the indie label, LayerCake Productions. Look for her first novel, a paranormal mystery due for release in April 2015: The Tramp, Book One of the Bound Chronicles.

Banner4

Goodreads button

PromoGraphic

Email: layercakeproductionsllc@gmail.com

Twitter: @SWathen_Author

Facebook: SarahLWathen

Tumblr: swathen.tumblr.com

Instagram: sarah.wathen

Wattpad: SarahWathen

Medium: @sarahwathen

More on LayerCake Productions: www.layercakeproductions.com

Review – Across the Pond by Michael McCormick

AcrossThePondCover

Across The Pond by Michael McCormick is the story of a young American who fights for his country during the war in Vietnam, only to be rejected when he returns home. The author, based the book on his personal experience as an infantry squad leader who served in combat. In the foreword for the book, author Ron Kovic wrote, “This little book grips the reader from the very beginning and does not let go.”

Buy @ Amazon

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

AuthorPhoto2

Michael McCormick is the author of Across The Pond. He enlisted in the United States Marine Corps just out of high school at the age of 17. Soon after, he found himself in battle in the jungles and rice paddies of Vietnam. He was nearly killed on several occasions, but managed to survive and return home at age 19. After the war, Michael earned his B.A. in psychology and his M.A. in clinical psychology. He lives in Oakland, California with his wife Gina. You can contact him at: mikemccormick49@ymail.com.

Goodreads | Amazon | Twitter

REVIEW

Across the Pond: An emotional story of a young soldier in the Vietnam War

“Across the Pond” by Michael McCormick is not just another book about the Vietnam War. The author puts us in the shoes of Shawn McBride, known as Mac, an enlisted man in the U.S. Marine Corps. We get a first-hand account of what it was like to actually be there.

Not enough has been written in book form about this particular war, as very few, if any, veterans are willing to tell their tale. Students of all ages could benefit greatly from this short readable story.

Heart-wrenching moments when a soldier cannot tell if a boy is just a child or Vietcong, are almost unbearable. And some of the violence and inhumanity are hard to take. But, this is a story that needs to be told and is well worth the read.

The book begins in the heat of war in Vietnam and takes us through the first chapters detailing what happens to Mac. A quick flashback to the family farm reminds the reader of how simple life can be. As dangerous as farm work is, it is a world away from the jungles and rice paddies of the front.

Mac was a driven young man and yearned to get out into the world. So much so that he signed up with the Marines just for a chance to “cross the pond,” known as the Pacific Ocean and do his part in Vietnam.

Anyone with a father, grandfather, brother, or other loved one who served in Vietnam would enjoy this book.

The background of the author adds much weight to this tale. Like the protagonist, he also served in Vietnam and hailed from rural Ohio. Michael McCormick also earned a Purple Heart and a Silver Star Medal at the ripe old age of nineteen upon returning home.

All this is packed into an easily readable 54 pages. The tale will make the reader experience a range of emotions, but likely reduce any feeling person to tears by the end.

McCormick literally takes us to hell and back in this book. Readers will live and breathe this war as a shared nightmare. The detailed storytelling puts a genuine human touch on the events that occurred, making this a very important read.

QUOTES

“I think war is a crime, if you don’t believe me, ask the infantry, ask the dead.”

“With this work, McCormick takes his place among the other important chroniclers of this period.”

“Sean McBride had survived his war in Vietnam. At the age of nineteen, he was about to be decorated with the Silver Star Medal, the third highest military award for gallantry in action.”

“His experience in war had shaped his thinking in unique ways. He knew he was different from other men.”

 

GIVEAWAY

across the pond

The author is giving away a paperback copy of ACROSS THE POND to one winner of the Rafflecopter.
a Rafflecopter giveaway

 

Cover Reveal – The Tramp by Sarah Wathen

Take a Look at the Beautiful Cover for The Tramp

TheTrampCover
 

TitleThe Tramp (The Bound Chronicles Book 1)
 
GenreMystery, Thriller &Suspense  > Supernatural > Fantasy > Paranormal & Urban 
 
Author: Sarah Wathen
 
Cover: Sarah Wathen
 
Release DateApril 13, 2015
PromoGraphic

Banner3

Book Description

When John was seven, he found Candy dancing in the neighboring yard wearing a yellow polka-dot bikini and red rain galoshes, splashing and dancing and singing at the top of her lungs. She saved his throat from getting ripped out by her grandma’s guard dog. Good thing she did, too. It was John who raised the alarm that day, when the man who smiled with his mouth but not his eyes drove off with Candy in a cloud of dust. The police stopped whatever might have happened next in a seedy motel—a place Candy doesn’t dare remember. John rescued her, creating a bond between two friends strong enough to awaken…something.

Years later, John and Candy begin to suspect something more sinister lurking amidst the days of football glory and the nights of clandestine rendezvous. John discovers disturbing symbols from the ancient tribes indigenous to the area in his history textbook, in a local cave system, and in his very dreams. Candy uncovers a family history that is more colorful than she knew. If shades of black are colorful.
If only the two friends could foresee the danger looming before them. For another something, one much more dangerous than the first, is waking up to continue the cycle.Murder forces everyone out of sunny valley torpor, and Candy realizes that more than acquaintance connects her with the killer. When a corpse is found, gutted as if for ritual, she knows that whatever evil has overtaken her hometown is moving forward. She will have to exorcise the haunting herself—though she has no idea how—and she will need John’s predestined help to do it. Candy will have to face the memories of that seedy motel room first. At least she finally understands the power she never knew she had—a link to her departed mother and a line of healers shrouded in pre-history.

Banner1

About the Author

sarahwathenphoto

Sarah Wathen is an artist turned author. She was trained in Classical Painting at the University of Central Florida, and received her Master’s in Fine Art from Parsons School of Design in New York City. If Florida was where she discovered her passion, New York was the place she found her voice. “Writing a book was my obvious next step, once I realized I’d been trying to tell stories with pictures for years,” she says about transitioning from visual artist to novelist. “Painting with words is even more fun than painting with oil.” Sarah lives in Florida with her husband, son, and at least a dozen imaginary friends from her novels. A painter at heart, her books incorporate art judicially, both in narrative content and supporting materials. Her characters are derived from the people and places that have influenced her own life—at least one beloved pet makes it into every book—but the stories they live will take you places you have never imagined, and won’t want to leave.
 Banner4
Banner2

GUEST BLOG POST by Debra Pickett

Debra_Pickett_sml

 Writing, for Busy People

We’re all busy.  It’s almost a competition these days, talking about how much you have going on and how little sleep you get.

So, if you’re living life and working a job and raising a family, adding something else to the mix – like, say, writing a book – might seem impossible.  And, sometimes, it’s true: there just aren’t enough hours in the day.  But, for a lot of us, a lot of the time, we can find that little bit of extra energy and focus to devote to a creative project if we make it a priority to do so.

I’m incredibly lucky to have honed my writing skills as a newspaper reporter with a daily deadline.  There is nothing better for building the muscles you need to write quickly (and, eventually, maybe even well) than the simple necessity created by the blank screen in front of you and the ticking clock over your shoulder.  The thing you learn this way is that, like so much in life, the key to writing is to just do it.  You just have to get words on the page.  They don’t have to be perfect.  They don’t even have to be good.  But they have to be there.  You have to have a place to start.  As a reporter, I’d start with my notes.  If I couldn’t think of anything better to write, I’d begin by just transcribing the handwritten scribbles from my spiral-bound reporter’s notebook, typing them out and reading them back to myself as they appeared on the screen.  Inevitably, a phrase or a quote or a really interesting fact would reveal itself and I would know I had something.  Anchoring my hopes on that single scrap, I’d bite my lip and start really writing.

Today, as a novelist, I try to apply that same method to writing fiction.  Almost everything I do begins with longhand notes – ideas, observations, snippets of overheard conversations – that I jot down in a little composition book that’s always in my bag.  That way, when I find the time to actually sit down at my computer to really work on my manuscript, I always have a place to start.  I begin by just typing my notes.  Sometimes, the best I can do with them is to find “homes” for them within my very detailed outline.  (I use Storymill software for maintaining a database of scenes, keeping a plot timeline and tracking details of my characters’ lives.  There are lots of tools out there to buy or make that can help you do the same.)  Other times, I can take some little moment and begin to craft it into an entire scene.  Either way, when I do sit down at my computer for writing time, I still hold myself to a deadline: I will work on this until 5:30. 

For me, planning and measuring out my writing time is essential to being productive.  I keep a ridiculously detailed calendar that includes my work commitments, my kids’ activities, personal appointments, social plans, my husband’s travel schedule, dedicated blocks of time for running and exercise and even the two TV shows that I consider to be required viewing (The Good Wife and Parenthood).  When I have a realistic and comprehensive view of how my time will be used in a given week, I then identify a couple of blocks of time that I can take for writing.  These precious hours need to come when the rest of my family is occupied and when I’m not completely exhausted.  Some weeks, I can only manage to find 90 minutes like this.  That’s not a lot, but it’s not zero, either.

As I said, I consider myself incredibly fortunate to have had a chance, in my journalism career, to develop the kind of discipline it takes to write when you have very limited time.  For those who haven’t had that chance, I think there are a few ways to cultivate the same mindset and skills.

First – and, in my experience, this was the very hardest thing – you have to give yourself permission to do this.  Writing a novel and having it published was a lifelong goal for me; truly, what I’d dreamed of doing since I was a little girl.  But, somehow, on a daily basis, other things always seemed more important.  I was either working a job (first as a journalist and then as a media consultant) or building my business (the legal PR firm I now run) or taking care of my kids or spending time with my husband or managing our house or running or cooking or cleaning up …. Well, you get the picture.  The idea of walking away from any of that in order to work on a creative hobby like writing felt just utterly selfish to me.  I have 3 kids less than 3 years apart in age.  There were several brutally sleep deprived early years when I simply could not fathom having “alone time” or “me time” that did not involve also getting the groceries.  Still, at a certain point, something clicked with me and I recognized that I was really losing myself in all those responsibilities.  I needed to write creatively again to find myself.  And, ultimately, I believe that my family is better off for having me happy, fulfilled and (not least) a role model for following your dreams and ambitions.

Second, it’s important to be realistic and clear about your goals and priorities.  Sit down and honestly assess the amount of time you can devote to writing.  For most of us, there is some amount of “lost” time we can reclaim for things that are important to us: the time we spend zoned out on the Internet or in front of the TV or flipping through magazines.  It’s important, though, to recognize that you do need some of this down time, just to give your brain a break.  For most of us, a plan to write for three hours each night after the kids go to be just isn’t going to work.  If writing is important to you, try to start by finding 1 or 2 hours a week to devote to it.  Maybe it will be your lunch break one day a week or maybe you’ll declare one night a week as “pizza night” and use the recovered cooking time for your project instead.  Or maybe you’ll escape to a coffeehouse on Sunday afternoon.  The point is: find some time and start there.

Third and finally, finding some kind of external accountability for being productive in your writing is key.  Whether you sign up for a course, join a writing group with weekly meetings, or try something totally off the wall, like NaNoWriMo, having other people invested in your work, and waiting to see what you produce, is a tremendous motivator.  If these options feel too social, you might also find an online forum or a personal writing coach, with whom you can agree on a schedule to deliver a certain number of words (of any quality) or a certain amount of time to devote to your project.

 

Website

Amazon

 

Guest Post By Author Bernadette Y. Connor

He's Mine Banner
Guest Post by Author Bernadette Y. Connor

PRESSING ON

 The one confession I have heard over and over from authors as I moved around the country is, “I hate doing book signings and personal appearances.”  One in particular labeled it, “The horse and pony show.”  We all know writing is something we do primarily in seclusion.  Why?  Because other people walk through our creative flow, pulling and dragging our juice through the house for one reason or another that has nothing to do with our process.  Retrieving the flow is next to impossible.  Most times, we have to wait for another cycle that may not even come close to the real meat of our original thoughts, and our creative voice changes. (Writers know what I mean by that.)

I am only speaking for myself here, and you can feel free to add your thoughts later; but, I am a diagnosed agoraphobic who has a major battle with my own psych to make every personal appearance.  Getting out of my pajamas, bathing and combing my hair to talk to real people face-to-face is one of the most intimidating things I do.  Not because I can’t speak or answer questions without sounding like I need to be committed immediately, but because I simply am not inclined to do it.  However, once I get started . . . someone might be sorry.  I have lots of opinions.

This piece is being offered because I understand your plight.  We write to communicate our thoughts to others and we really want them to read them.  In order to do that, we have to do all of the advertising things that bore us to tears.  Yes.  Repeating yourself irritates you.  Yes.  You will have to do it over and over because people tend to ask the same questions about your work.  Yes.  They will challenge you about characters you created, and you will wonder how on earth they could possibly know that.  Don’t argue . . . God has the same issue.  Learn to nod and say, “Really?”  If someone asks a question you haven’t been asked already, while welcomed, it might throw you for a loop.  If you’re fast on your feet you can respond coherently.  If not, you might make a faux pas.  The truth is it won’t be the end of the world either way.  In case you did not know it, people expect writers to be a bit quirky (You know . . . spending all of that time alone).  So, don’t be afraid to throw your shoulders back and speak up.  Have you heard some of the things actors say?  You can’t sound any stranger than some of them.  They actually depend on you to tell them what to say.  Go figure.

Anyway, promotion of your work is a necessary evil you have to conquer intermittently to share your gift with the world.  Reveal yourself.  Let others do as much for you as you can get away with, but press on.  It might cost a few bucks, but it’s worth it in the long run.  Let them help point you out.  Diamonds and gold in a hole are worthless.

 

Bernadette Y. Connor

Author

“He’s Mine!”

 

Hes-Mine-Final

Reviews

“He’s Mine! is a gripping tale of love, dysfunctional relationships, deceit, passion, infidelity and unrequited love.  Bernadette Connor writes unapologetic, in your face prose with her searing human touch.  Connor’s seventh novel is a must-read and will keep you guessing about the fate of Patrice Mays and Miles Alexander, until the last page.”

–         Thelma Balfour, author of Black Love Signs and Black Sun Signs (Touchtone/Simon & Schuster)

 

“Using passion and intrigue as her thread, Ms. Connor has woven a fascinating story. HE’S MINE! is a tale you’ll remember long after you turn the last page!”

–         B. Berry, author of Clothesline Blues and Cold Crazy(series)

 

“Love, murder and mayhem.  It is a love story after all!”

–         Lori Bryant Woolridge, Emmy winner and author of Can’t Help The Way That I Feel

unnamed

About The Author

Bernadette Y. Connor is a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She was born at home in a one-room apartment in North Philadelphia; the fourth of five children. To help her family financially, she sang rhythm and blues in many of the local nightclubs until she graduated from Dobbins Vocational Area High School in 1969 and was hired as a secretary by Sun Oil Company.

Bernadette’s first love was music, but she found herself writing poetry. Some of her earliest writings were published in SCLC monthly magazine. Both singing and writing had to take a back burner to caring for her family, butmidnight often found her doodling. A divorced mother of three, Bernadette saw that all of her children graduated from college.

Bernadette found her niche’ at AT&T as a communications technician. With the merger came a lay-off and she saw as an opportunity to begin a new career, but that was put on hold by a series of medical problems and finally the devastation of the brutal murder of her eldest son on Christmas Eve of 1991. Her zest for life, travel and adventure were nearly extinguished. However, Bernadette’s thoughts slowly returned to writing.

The literary fire was stoked by reacquainting herself with her earlier poems. Bernadette embarked on yet another adventure. She wrote a simple love story called “Finally” that opened the gate to an avalanche of works . . . 13 novels and 7 screenplays. Bernadette’s published debut novel, “Damaged!”, the first psychological thriller ever written and published by an African American garnered her a spot in “Who’s Who In America 2004”. Publishers Weekly dubbed her the “genre-crossing writer” and she loves the distinction.

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/HES-MINE-Bernadette-Y-Connor-ebook/dp/B00MSXFQEW/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1422475607&sr=1-1

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Bernadetteyconnor/info?tab=page_info

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/226340.Bernadette_Y_Connor

Book Tour Schedule: http://www.elitebookpromotions.com/book-tours/

Author Spotlight Ron Jayes

For publicity (2)

Ataxia is one of those weird conditions; even the effects cannot be fully explained, but it arrived with me slowly when I was around the age of 40. A very easy way of (partly) explaining it is: While walking, my feet will only rarely land on the exact spot my brain tell them to, therefore the brain will attempt to compensate – but how much? In which direction? For how much pressure? So the brain very often gets it wrong too. Walking would normally be in an automatic mode, but I have to concentrate… Also, one of the many side-effects is that much of my memory of my younger life has randomly disappeared and co-ordination is a thing of the past.

Now that’s done with, I’ll talk about my writing. Many years ago I read the classic ‘The Time Machine’ by H. G. Wells and sometime later the early James Hebert books, (‘The Rats’ and other gory stuff), I became hooked and thought, ‘I can do that.’ But I was busy and unfortunately it became ‘mañana thing,’ then the Ataxia arrived – forcing a stop to my work, (at the time I was a photographer) and suddenly my ‘tomorrow’ came! I tried other work before accepting early retirement. While typing from a seated position (!) it took a long time to write a book with a one fingered style of typing (the co-ordination required in typing loss was almost immediate), to explain: My left hand forefinger clicks all the digits – except one – my right hand forefinger hovers over the capitalization button, ready to pounce at a moment’s notice, like a coiled spring!

The aim in my writing was to produce a new style, featuring an everyday item having a totally unrelated result of unpredictability. My book “A Disturbance in Time” spilled out of me at an exciting rate and gives a new slant on time travel – without it being the main subject of the book. The foremost character is Elizabeth and the story is telling how her fate twists and unravels in an entirely unexpected way. All three main characters have an inner strength, but their slight vulnerability turn them from book characters to real people, adding a lot of warmth to the unpredictable story.

A Disturbance in Time cover picture

Book Description

In this disturbing, exhilarating debut novel, three apparently unconnected events and places are all mysteriously bound up across time and space… In 1668, in an isolated community in the wilds of Exmoor, a poor peasant family is terrorized by a crazed witchfinder. More than three-hundred years later, the crew of HMS Leopard welcome on board two distraught young girls, the survivors of a shipwreck off the coast of East Africa. And at the beginning of the new millennium three geeky lads build an experimental computer (during their summer school holiday), and end up with much more than they bargained for. Part fantasy, part thriller, this is a powerful novel that asks profound questions about the nature of destiny and responsibility, power and love.

Get The Book

Website

Enter To Win